Summer Renewal 12: What Have You Read?

Summer’s a great time for reading. Actually, any time is a great time for reading. A lot of people like to take a few good books on vacation, or spend warm summer evenings at home with a book. I had a high school teacher who implored us to always be reading something. It doesn’t have to be academic or career-related. It doesn’t need to be literature (whatever that is). You don’t have to make weekly trips to the library. But you should always be reading something. I think that’s a good rule to follow. There’s no pressure, no deadlines. But there’s always something there on the nightstand.

BooksThis is the part of the post where I’m supposed to recommend some things for you to read. But you already have your own list. You don’t need me to add to it. I have to admit that I haven’t read any educational technology books this summer. I read strange, eclectic things. This summer, I re-read Orwell’s 1984. I also read The Hungry War: An Account of the American Revolution, a 45-year-old book that our school library was throwing away. I read a little Vonnegut, and some beer books, and that new book about the wizard. Like I said, you don’t want recommendations from me.

There’s no shortage of educational technology books out there. You could read David’s, or Will’s, or Alan’s, or Jen’s, or one of the countless others out there. But I find that I’d rather read their blogs and listen to their podcasts than read the books.

If you find that your bookshelf is overstuffed with volumes that you’re never going to read again, you may be interested in one of the online book trading sites. Essentially, you agree to trade your used books for other people’s. You’re not selling them online, you’re just swapping them for something you haven’t read yet. There are several sites that do this, including BookMooch, PaperBack Swap, Bookins, and Frugal Reader. In most cases, you just have to pay postage.

Assignment: Go read something that’s longer than a Reader’s Digest article that doesn’t involve horcruxes.

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Author: John Schinker

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