Don’t Waste Their Time

When I was in high school, I joined an Explorers group of future teachers that met monthly to get experience and information about the teaching profession from teachers and university professors. One month, we had a high school English teacher from a neighboring school talk to us. I don’t remember very much about her. But her advice still stays with me, all these years later.

3304801086_c261c6be3f_mShe talked about time. She reminded us that there’s only one person in the classroom who chooses to be there. The learners don’t have much say in the matter. They have to take Sophomore English (or 6th grade math, or 2nd grade science). They are compelled to attend. They have to be there. As a teacher, you are taking forty minutes of their lives away from them every day. That’s forty minutes that they’re never going to get back again. It is morally wrong to squander that time.

That doesn’t mean that every minute of every class is spent in rigorous academic learning tied to measurable content standards. But there are days when you don’t feel like being a teacher. Maybe it was a late night last night. Maybe you have sick kids at home, or the car broke down, or you had an argument with your partner. Maybe you’re not excited about this particular unit. Maybe this is a challenging group of kids. Maybe you’re just trying to hold on until Winter Break. But that doesn’t give you the right to slack off. That doesn’t give you permission to phone it in. You’re the professional. They’re giving you an irreplaceable piece of their lives. Do something meaningful with it.

I spend a lot of my life waiting for other people. I’m generally early for appointments. I try to have relevant agendas for meetings that I lead. When given an opportunity to address a group, I try to make my comments as brief and to-the-point as possible. I don’t send lots of emails to big groups of people. I don’t call when I can email or text, because I rarely presume that the thing I want to talk about is more important than whatever it is that they might be doing at that particular moment. I try not to waste their time.

The other thing that the teacher told us years ago had to do with the teacher’s calendar. “We have 180 school days per year,” she explained. “We also have two teacher report days. That makes 182 days that I have to work per year.” She went on. “That means I have 183 days OFF.” She let it sink in, and then elaborated. If she needs to stay after school, or do some work in the evenings, or attend a meeting or professional development session, she just does it. She tries not to call in sick. She only uses personal leave if it’s a dire emergency. If teachers are indispensable professionals, necessary components of student learning, they have to be in the classroom. And while we work more days now than she did then, the point is still well taken. One of my pet peeves about this time of year is hearing teachers complaining about how short their summers were, and how they’re not ready to be back. I don’t begrudge them the 13 weeks of vacation, but I also don’t really have a lot of patience for the “I don’t have time” argument.

In this profession, we’re choosing to spend our lives in the noble pursuit of learning. Let’s make sure we’re getting everything out of it that we can. Don’t waste their time.

Photo credit: Berc on Flickr

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Author: John Schinker

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